Willows Pediatrics Blog - We Know Kids
We Know Kids
The Willows Pediatrics Blog

Category: Willows Pediatrics

Willows Receives Award from the Connecticut Immunization Registry and Tracking System (CIRTS)

Willows Pediatric Group has done it again!  Based on data from the Connecticut Immunization Registry and Tracking System (CIRTS), we have achieved a 94% immunization rate at age 2 years, for our patients born in the year 2013. This has contributed to sustaining Connecticut’s high immunization rate.  We are proud to continue our tradition of receiving this annual recognition from CIRTS.

The physicians, PA’s, and nurses at Willows are dedicated to informing parents about the benefits of vaccines, and vaccinating your children at an appropriate age to keep them protected from diseases.

Willow's CIRTS Award 2017

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Peter Czuczka’s Retirement Boombox

Dr Peter Czuczka Willows Pediatrics Westport, CT

The Czuczka Family and Willows Pediatrics invite you to participate in Peter Czuczka’s Retirement “Boombox.” A Boombox is a personal gift box, filled with well wishers’ messages and photos.

The Boombox website privately captures notes from each of you, which will be designed and printed on 5×7 cards to place inside a keepsake box for Peter Czuczka in honor of his retirement.

Every note is typeset by a designer and printed on an individual card.

Help us celebrate Dr. Czuczka!  We know he’ll treasure every note. Click on “WRITE A MESSAGE” at the bottom of this screen to enter the website and submit your message.

The deadline is 11/01/2017 
Thank you so much,

The Czuczka Family and Willows Pediatrics

WRITE A MESSAGE TO DR. CZUCZKA

If you are unable to click on the button above, please copy and paste this URL into your browser: https://app.boomboxgifts.com/contribute/b629fb2e563560223fbf4e8a19cbb7f6

Note: If you know someone that would like to contribute to this Boombox, feel free to forward this link.

Willows Pediatrics Gives Back at the Connecticut Food Bank

Willow's Pedicatrics team giving back at the Connecticut food bankA number of our physicians, PA’s, nurses, lab techs and receptionists recently teamed up with the Connecticut Food Bank to give back to our local community last month. The Willows team gathered at the food bank’s Fairfield location to sort and package food for those in need.

We filled 442 bags and nearly two full pallets of boxes. This is not the first time the physicians and staff at Willows have volunteered at the Connecticut Food Bank. Read More

Travel To And From School Safely With Advice From Willows Pediatrics

Now that we’ve got a month of school under our belts here in Fairfield County, Willows Pediatrics thought it would be a good time to share some tips for school-travel safety with parents of school-aged children.

We love seeing kids in Westport, Fairfield and other local towns walking, biking and even skateboarding to school! It’s reminiscent of a simpler time, it’s a wonderful way to get the blood flowing (and get the “wiggles” out), and it’s great exercise too!

But here are a few things to remember if you get to school by foot. Read More

Hand Sanitizers at Willows Pediatrics

If you or your child has used the restroom during a visit here at our Westport office, you may have noticed that instead of soap and paper towels or air dryers, we have alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Why, with the press about the possible negative effects of over-using hand cleansers, would Willows Pediatrics have these in our office?

The first reason is a practical one. When we originally opened our offices at 1563 Post Road East we did in fact, stock the restrooms with soap and paper towels. Unfortunately, young children repeatedly dropped the towels into the toilets and we had clogs on a regular basis.  We considered getting air dryers, but had to rule those out due to the fact that our hearing and vision testing rooms are located adjacent to the restrooms and the noise would interfere with the hearing tests.

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Willows Talks About The Family Bed & Co-Sleeping

Willows Talks About The Family Bed & Co-Sleeping

Many families spend their days together. Others stay together at night too! The “family bed,” or co-sleeping is a common practice in many societies, and there are advocates for it here in the U.S. too. However, there are child safety concerns related to having adults and children share a bed. So, is it an acceptable practice?

A recent blog posted on CT Now (and written by former local mom Sarah Cody), asked the same question. She’d heard about the possible benefits of co-sleeping—better nursing and enhanced emotional security—but worried about the dangers to newborns and infants, including injury and suffocation.

She turned to Willows Pediatric Group physician Dr. Jeff Owens for his take on the issue. Dr. Owens rightly pointed out that ‘”The American Academy of Pediatrics still doesn’t recommend it.” He also noted that the dangers stem from two major concerns: soft bedding and impaired judgment. A baby should never sleep on a futon, couch or waterbed, and a parent should not drink, smoke or use drugs with the infant nearby.  Moreover, twenty-four hour bonding can challenge a couple’s need for a healthy physical relationship and leave a mother drained and exhausted.

However, Dr. Owens did allow for some wiggle room. “If it’s a stark, firm [bed] and the baby is on his back, the baby is probably safe.” Dr. Owens believes we should also respect different cultures, some of which believe “the family bed” is the answer to peaceful nights and strong attachments.

In other words, “do what works for your family as long as it’s a safe situation.”

Willows Pediatrics Offers The M-CHAT: A Tool For Early Autism Detection

Recently Time magazine featured a brief article about early detection of autism. The column correctly noted that because autism’s behavioral symptoms don’t become obvious until about age 3, pediatricians have been challenged to find ways to pick up indicators of the condition at an earlier age.

“But,” as the article stated, “researchers say it may be possible to detect subtle warnings of the developmental disorder as early as 12 months—and all it takes is a simple 24-item questionnaire that parents can complete in the pediatrician’s waiting room.”

Good news for patients at Willows Pediatric Group: we routinely offer the M-CHAT, a screening test like the one referred to above, to children at their 15-month checkup. M-CHAT, which stands for Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, is widely recognized and recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The M-CHAT does not provide a diagnosis, but it can indicate if a child is at risk and should receive further evaluation.

In terms of insurance coverage, we submit this service to your insurance company, but as is with all services provided in this office, we do not know or guarantee that your insurance company will pay for the service. At Willows we strive to provide the best care to your child without regard to reimbursement. If you have any questions about reimbursement please feel free to call us and we will help to guide you through the insurance maze.

At Willows, we are always available to discuss your child’s health and any behavioral issues that may be of concern. Child development is an integral part of child health and we are here to answer any questions you have about your child’s speech and language or social skills. If you have any questions about M-CHAT or other child development issues, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Connecticut Magazine Recognizes Dr. Czuczka and Dr. Owens

Willows Pediatric Group is proud and excited to announce that Connecticut Magazine has included two of our physicians, Dr. Peter Czuczka and Dr. Jeffrey Owens, on their list of “Top Doctors” for 2011. This is Dr. Czuczka’s fifth year as a “Top Doc,” and this is Dr. Owens’ first year to receive the honor. (Dr. Czuczka was previously recognized in 2001, 2008, 2009 and 2010.)

The April 2011 issue of Connecticut Magazine includes its annual “Top Docs” feature, a listing of specialists in a variety of medical fields who have been selected based on the results of a survey of Connecticut physicians. Five thousand questionnaires were sent throughout the state asking doctors to recommend a physician (other than themselves) “to whom they would send a loved one for expert medical care.”

We congratulate Dr. Czuczka and Dr. Owens for being recognized by their peers. Willows Pediatrics takes pride in knowing that all six of our physicians—and our entire medical team—are at the top of their field and are providing compassionate, expert pediatric care to hundreds of local families.

Iron: How Much is Enough for Your Infant or Toddler?

How much iron should my baby have?

Photo via Wikimedia.com

In November 2010, the AAP issued new age-based recommendations for iron intake in infants and toddlers. Because iron deficiency can have irreversible long-term effects on children’s cognitive and behavioral development, the AAP Committee on Nutrition stated that, “It is critical to children’s health that we improve their iron intake status starting in infancy.”

Babies born healthy at full term are born with sufficient iron stores for the first 4 months of life. Therefore, full-term babies do not need iron supplements prior to four months of age. However, if the infant is breast-fed, the AAP now recommends a 1-mg/kg daily dose of oral iron starting at four months, and continuing until an infant begins eating solid iron-rich foods – typically around six months of age. (Formula-fed infants will receive sufficient iron in their formula and do not need a supplement between four and six months of age.)

There is one caveat: Preterm infants do require iron during the first four months. If they are bottle-fed, the iron-fortified formula will provide the proper amount for these infants. However, according to the AAP, preterm infants who are breast-fed should take a 2-mg/kg daily dose of iron starting at one month of age.

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