Willows Pediatrics Blog - We Know Kids

We Know Kids

The Willows Pediatrics Blog

School Start Time, Sleep and Your Adolescent: Time for a Change

Sleep for Success LogoIf your high-school-aged teen has struggled getting up for school in the morning, you are not alone.  What has been commonly observed, that adolescents’ sleep cycle shifts as they hit puberty so that adolescents become night owls, have trouble waking up in the morning, and then experience excessive sleepiness during the day – has recently received national attention as a public health issue.

With the benefit of neuroscience we now know that teens aren’t just lazy; their natural sleep cycles make it difficult for them to fall asleep before 11:00 p.m. and wake up before 8:00 a.m.  This is because adolescents’ biological sleep-wake cycle begins to shift two to three hours later at the start of puberty.  This sleep-phase shift affects teenagers around the world, regardless of parenting methods, technology use, or sleep hygiene.  Even adolescents in pre-industrial cultures without cell phones or computers develop the same sleep-cycle delay.

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Willows Pediatrics Gives Back at the Connecticut Food Bank

Willow's Pedicatrics team giving back at the Connecticut food bankA number of our physicians, PA’s, nurses, lab techs and receptionists recently teamed up with the Connecticut Food Bank to give back to our local community last month. The Willows team gathered at the food bank’s Fairfield location to sort and package food for those in need.

We filled 442 bags and nearly two full pallets of boxes. This is not the first time the physicians and staff at Willows have volunteered at the Connecticut Food Bank. Read More

Willows Pediatrics Joins the Maker Faire

Maker Faire Drone

Willows Pediatrics was proud to join the 2017 Westport Maker Faire as a sponsor. Under the theme “Creative Kids,” Dr. Jonathan Sollinger hosted our booth. The Willows’ patients and families representing us at our booth enjoyed a full day of creating and sharing with the over 10,000 individual who attended the annual event. Our patients made over 30 batches of Slime with other kids who stopped by, explained how drones work, taught how to make colorful custom lip balm and displayed a sign created for a heat safety campaign to keep kids and pets safe in cars and took photos of the Faire. Thanks to drone technology and the entrepreneurial spirit of a Willow’s patient, we also helped capture a bird’s eye view of the Maker Faire opening from above, and shared the experience of learning how to fly a drone and take the steps needed to earn FAA certification as a remote drone pilot. Many thanks to all of our families for donating their time and sharing their talents, and we hope many others were able to attend and enjoy the activities and innovations, and came away inspired to develop their own crafts and ideas.

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Breastmilk Storage Guidelines*

Breastmilk Storage Guidelines

*for home-use for healthy full term infants (Storing times may differ for premature or sick babies. Please check with us.)

We know new parents have a lot of things to worry about! At Willows, we believe that remembering breastmilk storage times shouldn’t be one of them. Here’s a quick reference for you to bookmark, download or print for easy access. Please keep in mind, these are guidelines – not strict rules. For more detailed information, please see the links in the references below. When in doubt, call one of our lactation consultants, Cathy and Dana, with any questions or concerns.

Breastmilk Storage Guidelines

REFERENCES:

Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine.  Clinical Protocol Number #8: Human Milk Storage Information for Home Use for Healthy Full Term Infants.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Proper Storage and Handling of Human Milk.

Head Injury and Concussion Care

willows concussion blogConcussion Care for Active Children and Adolescents in Fairfield County

Despite taking precautions, active children and adolescents may experience head injuries, need to be evaluated, and appropriate return to school and play guidelines must be provided. Year round, Willows Pediatrics is committed to providing complete, consistent and comprehensive concussion management for our patients. However, with school starting and “Concussion Season” upon us, we want to review the services and expertise Willows Pediatrics can provide to children and adolescents who experience a head injury. Read More

Teething Myths Revealed

Teething Myths - Fact from FictionFor generations, a host of symptoms and behaviors have been attributed to infant teething. It is not unusual for parents to wonder if crankiness, diarrhea, drooling, diaper rashes and trouble sleeping are related to teething, illness or a normal phase of development.

A recent analysis of the medical literature related to teething found that teething causes babies to rub their gums, be a little crankier and drool more.  This conclusion was the result of of a meta-analysis, published in March 2016 in the journal, Pediatrics, where over one thousand citations from researchers around the world regarding teething were studied.  The researches then narrowed down the citations to 22 studies from eight different countries to concentrate on.  The children in the studies ranged from birth to age 3 years.  The authors, led by Carla Massignan, DDS, concluded gum irritation, irritability and drooling were the main manifestations of infant teething.  A key finding is that while some infants have a slight rise in their temperature, it was not up to 100.4 degrees F, the standard cut off for a fever.  Based on their meta-analysis, the authors concluded teething does not cause a full-fledged fever or any other sign of actual illness.  Now, based on the research, lets look at some of the myths and facts surrounding teething:

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Trumenba (Meningitis B) Vaccine Now Available

Bacterial meningitis (infection around the spinal cord and brain) or sepsis (infection in the blood stream) is an extremely serious illness. The bacterium Neisseria meningitis (meningococous) is a cause of meningitis or septic shock in adolescents and young adults.

Even with appropriate antibiotics and intensive care, between 10 and 15 percent of people who develop meningococcal disease die, and another 10 to 20 percent suffer complications, such as brain damage or limb loss. Read More

Building an Early Literacy Toolkit

A favorite memory for many parents is reading aloud to their young children. But more than just a family routine or ritual, early and shared reading promotes early brain development and builds emotional bonds between parents and children during the critical early childhood years. Reading out loud, right from birth, is the foundation of your child’s literacy and a springboard for their future reading skills.

The Academy of Pediatrics has developed an Early Literacy Toolkit with ideas and suggestions that parents can adopt to support their child’s literacy. There is a toolkit for each critical age range in early childhood, infants up to 11 months, one year olds and two year olds. The advice in each toolkit takes advantage of the developmental stages at each age, so that parents can not only have fun, but do the most age appropriate activities to prepare their child for a life long love of reading and learning. Read More

Sleep Teaching Can’t Be One-Size-Fits-All

“Many parents who come to me share the fact that, well before they end up in my office, they have read a pile of sleep advice books without getting results,” says a local sleep consultant in Westport, CT.  “As a result, they often worry there is no real solution for the problems they face with their child’s sleep.”

However, the specialist adds, “The good news is, with the several hundred families I’ve worked with, this has never been the case. The problem isn’t with their child – it’s with the source they’re using for help with getting a child to sleep.” Read More